Johnson & Johnson Inc. (NYSE:JNJ) to recall Tylenol

Boston, MA 05/06/2013 (wallstreetpr) – The recall history of Johnson & Johnson Inc. (NYSE:JNJ) (Closed: $85.75, Up by 0.69%)  continues to grow with its recent recall of children’s Tylenol produced from it South Korea unit. The decision to recall was made after the results of a quality control test which showed that some of the bottles contained higher than the specified concentration of acetaminophen. This is the active ingredient of the children’s Tylenol suspension which is available in the cherry flavor in 100mg and 500mg bottles.

Johnson & Johnson Inc. (Nyse:Jnj) History Of Recall
The global leader of healthcare products had been constantly facing heavy production issues from 2010 which resulted in the recall of many of its healthcare products and drugs. A recall on children’s Tylenol was also made in the United States which was followed by the company consenting to oversee some of its manufacturing facilities with the US regulators. Further the company had also recalled its meters used for testing the blood sugar and metal hip implants. The recall list also includes bone putty which was aimed to stop bleeding from wounds. Such recall histories have resulted in deteriorating effect of the reputation of the company through the years.

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Published by Lisa Ray

Lisa has a Bachelor of Arts in journalism from Purdue University and 3 years of experience in the publishing field.